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Courses & Requirements

Beyond the General Education, Language and Culture, Cooperative Education, and Electives requirements, psychology majors must complete the following:

Total number of credits toward the major: 52

Core requirements in the Major
36 credits toward the major
PSYC 105 General Psychology* (4 credits)
PSYC 110 Foundations of Social Psychology* (4 credits)
PSYC 225 Developmental Psychology (4 credits)
PSYC 230 Personality Theories (4 credits)
PSYC 235 Abnormal Psychology (4 credits)
PSYC 305 Careers in Psychology (4 credits)
PSYC 400 Basic Therapeutic Skills (4 credits)
MATH 330 Statistics (4 credits)
SSC 490 Social Science Research Methods (4 credits)
SSC 494 Social Science Senior Seminar (4 credits)
SSC 495 Social Science Senior Project (4 credits)

* Foundation Courses: Credits earned in foundation courses count toward the general education requirement.

Intermediate Courses in ANTH, PECO or PSYC: Choose 1
4 credits toward the major
ANTH 205 Philosophy and Religion (4 credits)
Also listed as PHIL 205
ANTH 210 Language and Culture (4 credits)
ANTH 220 Contemporary Indigenous Peoples (4 credits)
ANTH 225 Visual Culture (4 credits)
Also listed as ARTS 225
ANTH 290 Independent Study (Intermediate) (4 credits)
PECO 210 U.S. Political System (4 credits)
PECO 220 Intermediate Micro- and Macro-Economic Theory (4 credits)
PECO 250 Economic Anthropology (4 credits)
Also listed as ANTH 250
PECO 270 Political Economy Theory (4 credits)
PECO 280 Global Political Economy (4 credits)
Also listed as ANTH 280
PECO 299 Independent Study (Intermediate) (4 credits)
PSYC 210 Ecopsychology (4 credits)
PSYC 240 Somatic Psychology (4 credits)
PSYC 242 Cognitive Psychology (4 credits)
PSYC 250 Depth Psychology (4 credits)
PSYC 252 Community Mental Health (4 credits)
Advanced Courses in PSYC: Choose 2
8 credits toward the major
PSYC 315 Psyche, Myth & Culture (4 credits)
Also listed as ANTH 315
PSYC 320 Political and Ethical Issues in Psychology (4 credits)
PSYC 350 Intersectional Identities in Psychology (4 credits)
PSYC 385 Psychological Assessments and Measurement (4 credits)
PSYC 390 The Art of Psychological Inquiry (4 credits)
PSYC 395 Special Topics in Psychology (4 credits)
PSYC 400 Basic Therapeutic Skills (4 credits)
PSYC 405 Group Theory and Dynamics (4 credits)
PSYC 430 Critical Psychology (4 credits)
PSYC 440 Independent Study (Advanced) (4 credits)
Advanced Courses in ANTH or PECO: Choose 1
4 credits toward the major
ANTH 305 Anthropology of Space and Place (4 credits)
ANTH 310 Anthropology of Globalization (4 credits)
Also listed as PECO 310
ANTH 320 Anthropology of Healing (4 credits)
ANTH 325 Anthropology of Work (4 credits)
ANTH 345 Reading Ethnography as Theory I (4 credits)
ANTH 350 Reading Ethnography as Theory II (4 credits)
ANTH 360 Writing Culture (4 credits)
ANTH 370 Special Topics in Cultural Anthropology (4 credits)
ANTH 390 Independent Study (Advanced) (4 credits)
PECO 315 Environmental Economics (4 credits)
PECO 320 Labor Economics (4 credits)
PECO 330 Political Economy of Race and Gender (4 credits)
PECO 340 Political Economy of Not-for-Profits (4 credits)
PECO 350 Public Policy (4 credits)
PECO 390 Special Topics in Political Economy (4 credits)
PECO 399 Independent Study (Advanced) (4 credits)

Psychology

Psychology investigates the historical and ongoing dynamics in individuals, families, groups, culture, context, interiority, dreams, transformation, dialogue, symptoms, pathology, and healing. It honors the full scope of lived experiences, particularly as it relates to the complexity of individual, group, and collective behavior, cognitive patterns, and effective tendencies—in other words, the myriad ways in which we act, think, and feel. To this end, psychology-in-practice aspires to generally increase mental health and general well being, and to help alleviate distress and suffering. Students in the psychology major will have the opportunity to develop basic therapeutic skills, a critical understanding of contemporary Western psychology, and a deeper awareness of “self” as a citizen of the global community.

Courses & Requirements

Beyond the General Education, Language and Culture, Cooperative Education, and Electives requirements, philosophy majors must complete the following:

Total number of credits toward the major: 52

Core Requirements in the Major
28 credits toward the major
LIT 210 Introduction to the Literary Tradition in English (4 credits)
HIST 210 African American History, from the Colonial Period to the Present (4 credits)
PHIL 210 Philosophy and Literature (4 credits)
PHIL 330 Ancient Philosophy (4 credits)
PHIL 332 Modern Philosophy (4 credits)
HUM 494 Senior Seminar in the Humanities (4 credits)
HUM 495 Senior Project in the Humanities (4 credits)
Foundation Course in Philosophy: Choose 1*
PHIL 105 Epistemology: Theories of Knowledge (4 credits)
PHIL 110 Law and Justice in the Western Tradition (4 credits)

* Credits earned in foundation courses count toward the general education requirement.

Advanced Courses in Philosophy: Choose 3
12 credits toward the major
PHIL 310 Special Topics in Philosophy (4 credits)
PHIL 320 Special Topics in Philosophy (4 credits)
PHIL 330 Ancient Philosophy (4 credits)
PHIL 331 Medieval Philosophy (4 credits)
PHIL 332 Modern Philosophy (4 credits)
PHIL 335 Feminist Philosophy & Political Theory (4 credits)
PHIL 410 Special Topics in Philosophy (4 credits)
PHIL 440 Selected Topics in Contemporary Philosophy (4 credits)
Intermediate Courses in HIS, LIT, or PHIL: Choose 1
4 credits toward the major
HIST 220 U.S. History I, from the Colonial Period to 1877 (4 credits)
HIST 221 U.S. History II, 1877 to the Present (4 credits)
HIST 225 World History I, to 1500 (4 credits)
HIST 226 World History II, from 1500 to the Present (4 credits)
HIST 230 African American History, from the Colonial Period to the Present (4 credits)
HIST 231 Latin American History, from the Colonial Period to the Present (4 credits)
HIST 232 Empire Building and Colonization in the Atlantic World II, since 1890 (4 credits)
HIST 233 U.S. Women’s History (4 credits)
HIST 240 Gender Expression and Sexual Orientation: A Global History (4 credits)
HIST 250 The Construction of Race and Ethnicity in North America (4 credits)
LIT 220 Introduction to World Literature (4 credits)
LIT 240 Introduction to Drama (4 credits)
LIT 241 Introduction to Poetry (4 credits)
LIT 242 Introduction to Fiction (4 credits)
ENG 250/
LIT 250
Creative Writing I (4 credits)
ENG 250/
LIT 251
Expository Writing I (4 credits)
LIT 290 Introduction to Advanced Study in Literature (4 credits)
LIT 299 Introductory Independent Study in Literature (4 credits)
ANTH 205/
PHIL 205
Philosophy of Religion (4 credits)
PHIL 220 Existentialism (4 credits)
PHIL 221 Environmental Ethics & Political Theory (4 credits)
PHIL 225 Critical Thinking (4 credits)
PHIL 229 Eastern Philosophy (4 credits)
Advanced Courses in HIS, LIT, or PHIL: Choose 2
8 credits toward the major
LIT 301 Advanced Independent Study in Literature (4 credits)
LIT 310 Studies in Major Authors (4 credits)
LIT 320 Gender in Literature (4 credits)
LIT 321 Ethnicity in Literature (4 credits)
LIT 330 Literary Movements and Moments I (before 1850) (4 credits)
ENG 350/
LIT 350
Advanced Creative Writing (4 credits)
ENG 351/
LIT 351
Advanced Expository Writing (4 credits)
LIT 370 Special Topics: Advanced Theoretical Approaches to Literature (4 credits)
LIT 399 Advanced Independent Study in Literature (4 credits)
HIST 330 The History of a City (4 credits)
HIST 331 The History of the American City (4 credits)
HIST 334 The History of a Person (4 credits)
HIST 335 The History of an Institution (4 credits)
HIST 370 Special Topics in U.S. History (4 credits)
HIST 470 Special Topics in the Practice of History (4 credits)
PHIL 310 Special Topics in Philosophy (4 credits)
PHIL 320 Special Topics in Philosophy (4 credits)
PHIL 330 Ancient Philosophy (4 credits)
PHIL 331 Medieval Philosophy (4 credits)
PHIL 332 Modern Philosophy (4 credits)
PHIL 335 Feminist Philosophy & Political Theory (4 credits)
PHIL 410 Special Topics in Philosophy (4 credits)
PHIL 440 Selected Topics in Contemporary Philosophy (4 credits)

Philosophy

The philosophy major is intended to give students a focused grounding in the history and practice of philosophy as part of their broader education in the humanities at Antioch College. Following the dictum laid down by Socrates that the unexamined life is not worth living, philosophy majors will examine fundamental topics such as the nature of justice, being, political community, reality, and the best way of life. Philosophy majors will learn to develop and support their own views with clarity, and they will connect their work in philosophy with ideas and methodologies from other disciplines through the 210 series of courses in philosophy, literature, and history.

Courses and Requirements

Beyond the General Education, Language and Culture, Cooperative Education, and Electives requirements, performance majors must complete the following:

Core Requirements in the Major
20 credits toward the major
PERF 103 Voice and Speech* (4 credits)
PERF 104 Presence of the Performer* (4 credits)
PERF 120 Styles of Live Art (4 credits)
PERF 220 Performance History/Critical Studies (4 credits)
PERF 320 Performance Studies (4 credits)
ARTS 494 Senior Seminar in the Arts (4 credits)
ARTS 495 Senior Project in the Arts (4 credits)

* Foundation Courses: Credits earned in foundation courses count toward the general education requirement.

Additional Requirements in the Major

Foundation Course: Choose 1*
MEDA 101 Media, Internet, and Society (4 credits)
MEDA 102 Basic Media Production (4 credits)
VISA 101 Visual Language: A Focus on Two Dimensions (4 credits)
VISA 102 Visual Language: A Focus on Three Dimensions (4 credits)

* Foundation Courses: Credits earned in foundation courses count toward the general education requirement.

Introductory and Intermediate Courses
Choose four 4-credit courses or a total of 16 credits
PERF 105** Vocal Music Instruction (1–2 credits)
PERF 106** Modern Dance (1–2 credits)
PERF 107** Individual Instruction in Music (1–2 credits)
PERF 108** Contact Improvisation (1–2 credits)
PERF 110 Performance on Location (4 credits)
PERF 140 Storytelling (4 credits)
PERF 150 Improvisation in Art and Life (4 credits)
PERF 230 Writing and Performing the Self (4 credits)
PERF 240 Site-Specific Performance (4 credits)
PERF 250 Rehearsal and Production (4 credits)
PERF 270 Special Topics in Performance with Resident Artist (4 credits)

** These courses are recommended for performance majors. Please note that they count for only 1–2 credits.
The BA degree requires a total of 52 major-related credits.

Advanced Courses
16 credits toward the major
PERF 320 Performance Studies (4 credits)
PERF 340 Rehearsal and Production Tutorial I (4 credits)
PERF 350 Documentary-based Performance (4 credits)
PERF 360 Advanced Topics in Performance (4 credits)
PERF 440 Rehearsal and Production Tutorial II (4 credits)
PERF 470 Advanced Special Topics in Performance (4 credits)
PERF 480 Independent Study: Performance (4 credits)

 

Performance

The performance major at Antioch College starts with the notion of the self as source and resource. Our classes feature an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes the presence of the performer and the responsibility of the artist to the audience. Students are encouraged to develop physical, vocal, and narrative skills through courses in voice and speech, basic acting, movement, storytelling, and autobiographical performance.

Through the investigation of voice, body, story, text, and space, students come to understand the connection between their own experience as performers and their responsibility to communicate to others. Students engage with generative and interpretive strategies, develop original works, and stage plays in order to reflect their learning as makers and scholars of performance.

As students progress they become familiar with history, contemporary practices, and theory through studies of interdisciplinary avant-garde performance, documentary theater and media, production classes, and site-specific collaborations with guest artists and community members. They come to understand the responsibility of the artist to take their art into the community as a transformative tool for themselves and others.

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