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Upcoming Events

Thursday, September 12, 2013 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm

Apprehending Black Womanhood: Criminality and Citizenship in African-American Women’s Literature

A public talk by Professor Courtney Marshall from the University of New Hampshire, titled: “Apprehending Black Womanhood: Criminality and Citizenship in African-American Women’s Literature”

Marshall is an Assistant Professor of English and Women’s Studies at the University of New Hampshire. Her research interests are African-American women’s literature and prison studies, and she has an article forthcoming in fat studies titled, “Too Fat To Execute: Fat Studies Meets Carceral Studies.” In addition to teaching, she leads a reading discussion group at the Northern New Hampshire Correctional Facility.

LOCATION: Olive Kettering Library


Friday, September 6, 2013 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm

Tossed and Found: Mining the Material Stream Opening Reception

The Herndon Gallery at Antioch College is pleased to announce the opening of its newest exhibition, titled Tossed and Found: Mining the Material Stream, presenting the work of artists who, through the manipulation of discarded matter, reveal its intrinsic qualities while transcending its aesthetic and cultural boundaries.

The exhibition opening will take place on Friday, September 6, 2013, with an opening reception at 7:00 p.m., and an artist talk at 8:00 p.m.  The exhibition will continue through November 15, 2013.

LOCATION: Herndon Gallery


Saturday, August 24, 2013 - 10:00am to 4:00pm

YS Community Skill Share

Yellow Springs Community Skill Share is based on the notion that everyone has something to learn, and everyone has something to teach. We want to foster an environment where community members can share their knowledge and experience with each other. YS Community Skill Share is a non-competitive, inter-generational and community-based program that is free and open to the public.
 
Join us for one-hour workshops throughout the day that teach a number of skills. Some workshop topics include:
• Homemade laundry soap making
• How to make herbal teas with 
 Antioch Farm herbs
• Zine-making
• Cartooning for kids
 

FOR MORE INFORMATION: WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/YSSKILLSHAREWORKSHOP
FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC, ALL AGES WELCOME, FREE CHILDCARE WILL BE PROVIDED

 

LOCATION: McGregor Hall, Antioch campus


Thursday, August 22, 2013 - 8:00pm to 10:00pm

Film Screening: Maestra

“Maestra” is a celebration of the joy of teaching and learning despite all obstacles. The triumph of the Cuban Revolution in January 1959 opened the way for putting into practice the Revolution’s goals, the reasons for having a revolution in the first place. One aim was to educate everybody, including all those people who never before had a chance to read or even to write their names.  
 
After two years of revolutionary practice, Cubans were ready to take education to everybody who had been left out by colonialism and dictatorship. On January 1, 1961, Cuba launched its National Literacy Campaign, which became a historical success and a model for other nations. What a revolution it was! About a million people mobilized to eliminate illiteracy in one year: more than 250,000 literacy workers and 707,000 adults who learned to read and write. More than 100,000 of these teachers were not yet 18 years old, and they are the center of this exciting documentary, directed and produced by Catherine Murphy.

LOCATION: McGregor Hall #113, Antioch campus


Thursday, August 15, 2013 - 8:00pm to 10:00pm

Japanese Film: The Kirishima Thing

"Kirishima, Bukatsu Yamerutteyo" tells the story of two high school students who crosses social boundaries between the elite and lower class at their school. Ryoya Maeda, from the lower class, is a member of the film club, while Hiroki Kikuchi, from the elite class, is a non-participating member of the high school baseball team.

LOCATION: McGregor Hall #113, Antioch campus


Sunday, August 11, 2013 - 2:00pm to 5:00pm

Creating Art from History: A Workshop

Kevin McGruder, assistant professor of history, is pleased to announce "Unwelcome History: The (Enslaved) African Presence in Old New York," an Antioch College interdisciplinary residency , featuring historian and Antioch alumna Dr. Martia Goodson ‘65.

In 1990 construction workers excavating for a federal office building in Lower Manhattan uncovered bones that led to the rediscovery of the African Burial Ground, a 18th century cemetery in which enslaved Africans were buried. Four hundred of the thousands of remains buried, were exhumed and analyzed, providing a new understanding of the harsh conditions in which enslaved Africans lived in New York City.  The site is now managed by the Federal Parks Service.  In this residency, Dr. Goodson explores historical, social, journalistic, anthropological aspects of this re-discovery from colonial America.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 11
Creating Art from History: A Workshop
2:00–5:00 p.m., McGregor Hall #147, Antioch campus
Dr. Goodson will read excerpts of historical fiction from Black Bones, her multidisciplinary work on the African Burial Ground Project.  Armed with a Fact Sheet on Old New York, a map of the colonial settlement, and other images, participants will discuss and begin to create their own works of art.

LOCATION: McGregor Hall #147, Antioch campus


Saturday, August 10, 2013 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm

Voices from the Graves: The Telling Teeth and Talking Bones of the New York African Burial Ground

Kevin McGruder, assistant professor of history, is pleased to announce "Unwelcome History: The (Enslaved) African Presence in Old New York," an Antioch College interdisciplinary residency , featuring historian and Antioch alumna Dr. Martia Goodson ‘65.

In 1990 construction workers excavating for a federal office building in Lower Manhattan uncovered bones that led to the rediscovery of the African Burial Ground, a 18th century cemetery in which enslaved Africans were buried. Four hundred of the thousands of remains buried, were exhumed and analyzed, providing a new understanding of the harsh conditions in which enslaved Africans lived in New York City.  The site is now managed by the Federal Parks Service.  In this residency, Dr. Goodson explores historical, social, journalistic, anthropological aspects of this re-discovery from colonial America.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 10
Voices from the Graves: The Telling Teeth and Talking Bones of the New York African Burial Ground
2:00–4:00 p.m., McGregor Hall #149, Antioch campus
In this workshop, we will study the descriptions from skeletal biologists and archeologists about the children, women and men who labored in Old New York between the 1690s and 1790s. We will examine and interpret images of skeletons of children, women and men whose remains were excavated from the African Burial Ground.

LOCATION: McGregor Hall #149, Antioch campus


Saturday, August 10, 2013 - 10:00am to 12:00pm

Colonial Newspapers: Complicit with Slavery

Kevin McGruder, assistant professor of history, is pleased to announce "Unwelcome History: The (Enslaved) African Presence in Old New York," an Antioch College interdisciplinary residency , featuring historian and Antioch alumna Dr. Martia Goodson ‘65.

In 1990 construction workers excavating for a federal office building in Lower Manhattan uncovered bones that led to the rediscovery of the African Burial Ground, a 18th century cemetery in which enslaved Africans were buried. Four hundred of the thousands of remains buried, were exhumed and analyzed, providing a new understanding of the harsh conditions in which enslaved Africans lived in New York City.  The site is now managed by the Federal Parks Service.  In this residency, Dr. Goodson explores historical, social, journalistic, anthropological aspects of this re-discovery from colonial America.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 10
Colonial Newspapers: Complicit with Slavery
10:00 a.m. – noon, McGregor Hall #149, Antioch campus
This workshop examines and interprets newspaper content about Africans in Colonial New York newspapers. Participants will study, especially, the sale and “freedom-seeker” ads published between the 1730s and the 1770s.
  

LOCATION: McGregor Hall #149, Antioch campus


Friday, August 9, 2013 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm

Some of Dem Bones: The New York African Burial Ground in Historical Perspective

Kevin McGruder, assistant professor of history, is pleased to announce "Unwelcome History: The (Enslaved) African Presence in Old New York," an Antioch College interdisciplinary residency , featuring historian and Antioch alumna Dr. Martia Goodson ‘65.

In 1990 construction workers excavating for a federal office building in Lower Manhattan uncovered bones that led to the rediscovery of the African Burial Ground, a 18th century cemetery in which enslaved Africans were buried. Four hundred of the thousands of remains buried, were exhumed and analyzed, providing a new understanding of the harsh conditions in which enslaved Africans lived in New York City.  The site is now managed by the Federal Parks Service.  In this residency, Dr. Goodson explores historical, social, journalistic, anthropological aspects of this re-discovery from colonial America.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 9
Some of Dem Bones: The New York African Burial Ground in Historical Perspective
7:00–9:00 p.m., McGregor Hall #113, Antioch campus
This lecture will describe the excavated cemetery and the African Burial Ground Project which unearthed the history of those who built New York. The re-discovery of the site in downtown Manhattan, the protests and research projects are explored in this discussion of the largest archeological find of the 20th century. A summary of the scientific findings (biological, archeological, and anthropological reports) and the current status of the National Monument are background for the presentation. The reports are available at
http://www.nps.gov/afbg/historyculture/archaeology-reports.htm

  

LOCATION: McGregor Hall #113, Antioch campus


Tuesday, August 6, 2013 - 7:30pm to 9:00pm

Photographer Haley Morris-Cafiero

On August 6, photographer Haley Morris-Cafiero will visit Antioch College to present her artwork, including Wait Watchers, a striking collection of self-portraits that double as an unsettling portrait of body-image perceptions in contemporary society. Ms. Morris-Cafiero's work has been featured in Salon.com and the Huffington Post. She is represented by A.I.R. Gallery (New York), and is Associate Professor and Head of Photography at the Memphis College of Art. She will present her work in a public lecture at 7:30pm, Tuesday August 6, in 113 McGregor Hall at Antioch College.

LOCATION: McGregor Hall #113, Antioch campus


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